Hiking in Rocky Mountain National Park

A hike in Rocky Mountain National Park. This particular trail has a couple of waterfalls and tons of rocks.

via 500px http://ift.tt/2tB3vk7

Lochsa River

The Lochsa River is in the northwestern United States, in the mountains of north central Idaho. It is one of two primary tributaries (with the Selway to the south) of the Middle Fork of the Clearwater River in the Clearwater National Forest. Lochsa is a Nez Perce word meaning rough water.[6][7] The Salish name is Ep Smɫí, “It Has Salmon.”[8]

The Lochsa (pronounced “lock-saw”) was included by the U.S. Congress in 1968 as part of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act.[9] The Lochsa and Selway rivers and their tributaries have no dams, and their flow is unregulated. In late spring, mid-May to mid-June, the Lochsa River is rated as one of the world’s best for continuous whitewater.

–wikipedia

via 500px http://ift.tt/2tf9GOH

Wendover Campground

Wendover Campground is situated on stretch of land along the Wild and Scenic Lochsa River off the Northwest Passage Scenic Byway and All American Road (US Highway 12) at mile post 158.2. With 27 campsites all positioned within a mature, moss covered pine forest and centered around a small stream, this campground offers a serene spot for camping, picnicking, fishing, hiking, nature viewing and most importantly, relaxing. — Forest Service

via 500px http://ift.tt/2v3IcI8

Lochsa Lodge

Unloading the truck at the Lochsa Lodge. The Lochsa Lodge is a “resort” just on the western side of the Idaho/Montana border. This location is also the site where Lewis and Clark camped during their expedition.

I spent a couple of days here, and will definitely return.

“Clark recorded that on the night of September 14, 1805, the Corps “Encamped opposit a Small Island at the mouth of a branch on the right side of the river which is at this place 80 yards wide, Swift and Stoney.” That river’s Indian name, which the journalists evidently never heard, is Lochsa, meaning swift water. The “branch”–a small stream–no longer flows; its bed was obliterated during the expansion of the ranger station. The men put their 40 horses on the island for the night, probably to discourage them from wandering away in search of food. The Corps bypassed this campsite by several miles on their return trip in June of 1806.

Powell Ranger Station of the Clearwater National Forest, which was built here about 1910, was named for the trapper and homesteader Charley Powell, who lived nearby at the time.” –lewis-clark.org

via 500px http://ift.tt/2sESBcK