Jack Fischer enters space

Jack Fischer
Flight Engineer
USA
Bio: http://ift.tt/2oYeDYH

Launched into space April 20, 2017
via NASA

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Week 11 – Tranquillity

Tranquillity: Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable.

As part of the Plan for Attaining Moral Perfection series,  I will be living one of the 13 virtues described by Benjamin Franklin in the Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin.  You can read how all this got started here.  This week I’ll be focused on living the virtue of Tranquillity.

If you’re interested in the book that inspired this, it is available for less than $4 including shipping on Amazon.  If you buy it through my link, by clicking on the image, I get 14 cents for the referral.

Week 10 – Cleanliness

Cleanliness: Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation.

As part of the Plan for Attaining Moral Perfection series,  I will be living one of the 13 virtues described by Benjamin Franklin in the Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin.  You can read how all this got started here.  This week I’ll be focused on living the virtue of Cleanliness.

If you’re interested in the book that inspired this, it is available for less than $4 including shipping on Amazon.  If you buy it through my link, by clicking on the image, I get 14 cents for the referral.

Week 9 – Moderation

Moderation: Avoid extreams; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve.

As part of the Plan for Attaining Moral Perfection series,  I will be living one of the 13 virtues described by Benjamin Franklin in the Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin.  You can read how all this got started here.  This week I’ll be focused on living the virtue of Moderation.

If you’re interested in the book that inspired this, it is available for less than $4 including shipping on Amazon.  If you buy it through my link, by clicking on the image, I get 14 cents for the referral.

6 Questions You Must Ask Your Wedding Photographer

Choosing the right wedding photographer is important.  After your wedding the only thing you’ll have other than memories will be the photos.  With all the expenses of the day, this one is arguably the most important.

For my wedding, one of my tasks was to choose the photographer.  I mostly decided based on photos I found online and really liked.  There were several great photographers that had actually done weddings at our venue, so it was easy to see how ours might come out. After finding a few photographers that were available and within budget, I came up with the following list of questions:

1.  Can I see a full wedding’s photos?

Photographers post only their best work online.  A full set of wedding photos will not look exactly like the small set that were hand selected for a website or social sharing.  Asking to see the whole wedding will show the total quality of the photos for an event.  It may be that only two or three photos turned out well from the wedding.  This is also a great time to see their technique in different scenarios.  Will your wedding be at night?  Ask to see a night wedding.  Can this photographer handle low light situations?  Mastering off camera flash isn’t easy for someone that normally shoots in natural light.  Would you be happy if this set of wedding photos is what was delivered to you?

2.  Are you insured?

You are going to want to make sure you are dealing with a professional, and that the professional is insured.  Insurance covers a wide variety of scenarios that rarely occur, but do happen.  Ask them about their contingency plans.  What happens if they get sick, have car trouble, or get hit by a bus the day of the wedding?  Pick someone that has an answer to these what-if scenarios.

3.  How many weddings have you shot as the primary photographer?

Experience is important.  A photographer may claim to have shot over 20 weddings, but this could have been done as a second shooter.  This experience is good, but you want to make sure your photographer has a good sense of timing, knows the shots to take, has experienced some challenges, and can manage their own second shooter.  The primary photographer is also generally in charge of the editing and handling the business/contract side.  A person with greater experience will also likely be more expensive.  If you’re looking to save money, choosing someone with less experience may be the way to go.  I would make sure that they have done at least 15 weddings as the primary.

4.  What are your deliverables?

You want to know what you are paying for.  Are you going to receive physical prints or digital images or both?  Can you make your own prints or do you need to buy them from the photographer?  Will the package include an engagement session?  These deliverables generally drive the price.

5.  What is the turnaround time on a final product?

You want to know when you’re going to receive your wedding photos.  A busy photographer can take a long time to go through and edit photos.  Don’t be shocked if a busy photographer says it will take 30 days.  You may prefer someone that can deliver them sooner, and will commit to two weeks instead of 4-6 for example.  If you do not ask, the photographer may take their time, and deliver the photos months after the event.

6.  Do you have backup equipment?

Backup equipment is required.  Equipment fails all the time, you want to make sure your photographer and their secondary shooters are covered in these cases.  Make sure they are going to bring multiple cameras, batteries, flashes, and memory cards.  Are they prepared for bad weather if it occurs?

 

Week 8 – Justice

Justice: Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are you duty.

As part of the Plan for Attaining Moral Perfection series,  I will be living one of the 13 virtues described by Benjamin Franklin in the Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin.  You can read how all this got started here.  This week I’ll be focused on living the virtue of Justice.

If you’re interested in the book that inspired this, it is available for less than $4 including shipping on Amazon.  If you buy it through my link, by clicking on the image, I get 14 cents for the referral.

My New Saltwater Aquarium

A couple of months ago, I decided it was time to get an aquarium.  I have kept a few in the past with moderate success, and it is one of the more attainable items on my small list of things I’d like to have.  I already have the best grill money can buy and a nice pool table.  The only remaining material items I want for a complete life are an indoor basketball court and a restaurant quality pizza oven.

I did a ton of research, mostly online, and by visiting a few local fish shops with Tommy.  Tommy loves watching the fish, which is another way I was easily able to justify the large purchase to myself.  These days there are tons of resources on youtube for beginners up to advanced aquarists.  One of the most informative is the 52 weeks of reefing series.  The host of the show has one of the more annoying voices I’ve ever heard, but the material is pretty comprehensive.  I’d say that I probably already knew about 50% of what he talked about before watching, but it was a good refresher.

The aquarium I decided on is the LED Coralife Biocube 32.  It is cube shaped glass and holds 32 gallons of water.  The appeal for me is that it is a bit of an all in one, in terms of most vital components.  The canopy itself made me choose it over most other models due to the fact that we have a very curious cat.  I was a bit worried that the cat might try to jump into the more modern topless options.  The aquarium provides areas for the mechanical and chemical filtration, as well as providing a pump to return water back to the main tank area after it has passed through the filter.

The aquarium comes with a canopy that provides LED lighting.  The LED lighting is a newer technology that was not available the last time I had an aquarium.  The LEDs are quite strong and good for keeping most corals. The canopy also has a built in timer that allows for controlling the time different light patterns are on or off.  In addition it has a setting simulating sunrise/sunset as well moonrise/moonset for the first/last thirty minutes of a cycle.  The moonlight setting at night is probably the coolest thing about the light setup.  It really makes the coral look great.

Other than the aquarium, I purchased a few additional items such as a heater, extra water pump, and cheap protein skimmer.  These components were pretty inexpensive and cost under one hundred dollars in total.

As shown, the initial setup consisted of 20 lbs of live sand and roughly 30 lbs of live rock.  A significant portion of the live rock was also aqua cultured which is a great sustainable way to get things started.  After the initial nitrogen cycle completes, it will be time to add some livestock.

 

 

Week 7 – Sincerity

Sincerity: use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly; and, if you speak, speak accordingly.

As part of the Plan for Attaining Moral Perfection series,  I will be living one of the 13 virtues described by Benjamin Franklin in the Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin.  You can read how all this got started here.  This week I’ll be focused on living the virtue of Sincerity.

Last week, as part of the Industry virtue, I deleted all social applications and reddit from my phone.  I haven’t deleted all my accounts, just the applications.  It has been a positive change.  I found myself spending significantly less time on my phone.  I didn’t receive a notification all week other than text messages and phone calls.  It is something I am going to continue.

If you’re interested in the book that inspired this, it is available for less than $4 including shipping on Amazon.  If you buy it through my link, by clicking on the image, I get 14 cents for the referral.